Drones
Drones

The drone that has been around the longest is a male bee who does no work. The new drone is a remote-controlled pilotless aircraft which does work. Yesterday our visiting coach from Israel, Tal Koren, brought modern technology to our practice and the his new tool will certainly work. 

For starters, the aerial view or bird's eye view will show players that the tennis court is actually a "narrow a playing field." A tennis court is just three feet short of being three times longer than it is wide. The view from the sky will let players know that angles are reduced when the "rally ball" is centered and that the "percentage angles" are the ones achieved by gaining proximity to the net.

Also, the drone will show players that they seldom get past the service line while playing singles. Seeing is believing. The service-line is not even half-way to the net (46%). If I had a penny for every time I saw a player go for a hundred dollar shot from a ten cent position , I'd pay cash for a beach front property.

The list of benefits provided by the drone goes on and on. The film created by the zone would be ideal for charting. One can see if the players and coaches are working hard. I would suggest using it for filming the much-dreaded ball pick-up, it would be one way to record the kid who always has to go to the bathroom during the ball pick-up. 

Tal's new instrument only cost $300. The drone does sound like a bunch of bees and the constant sound might remind kids to be as busy a bees.

Please check-out the attached film.

Steve Smith
GreatBase Tennis
www.GreatBaseTennis.com
.....extensive educational content.....
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Seven Month Review
Seven Month Review

The attached montage tells a story, a short story about GreatBase Tennis (GBT) and Tennis Memphis (TM). If you like tennis, children and music, I know you will enjoy the piece compiled by Kevin Duffy. Thank you for your watching and sharing.

Steve Smith
GreatBase Tennis
www.GreatBaseTennis.com
....extensive educational content.....
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A Different Slant
A Different Slant

For the really young players who only occasionally pick up a racquet, tennis is not so much fun. Over five decades, I have observed countless drills for early childhood development classes. Granted there are excellent drills for acquiring athletic skills, yet most drills are based on the "fun" factor. The biggest problem with the "hit and giggle" approach is motor-programming. The athlete is a bio-computer and from the get-go my observation is that a majority of players spend their first couple of years learning how "not" to play. Attached is a film of a five, six and seven year old; they are told if they can demonstrate the forehand and backhand that the can play a few minutes of soccer. I recommend that teachers and trainers of "little kids" combine a number of other sports within their lessons. Furthermore, I recommend that the course description for young tennis players states that they will truly learn tennis fundamentals, in conjunction with learning athletic and cooperative skills. Sooner or later the umpire will say, "Ready play."

Steve Smith 
GreatBase Tennis
www.GreatBaseTennis.com
....site has a twenty-five hour course....
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Nutrition
Nutrition

* He's on a light-food diet.....as soon as it gets light outside...he starts to eat.
* He's on a see-food diet......he eats all the food he sees.
* He only eats in three places: Here, There, and Everywhere.
* He avoids three things that make him look heavy... scales, mirrors and photographs.
* He doesn't care that beer is best defined as liquid bread.
* and.....He like his eggs....in a chocolate cake.

But seriously.... nutrition is so, so important. Three tips:
1) Remember sugar is a drug.
2) Pound water.
3) Sprinkle your colorful choice of fruits and vegetables with some lean meat.

On our video today, Tal Koren shares a short and sweet (no sugar) tip on nutrition.

Steve Smith
GreatBase Tennis
www.GreatBaseTennis.com
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Kalamazoo
Kalamazoo

I love Kalamazoo, so does everybody who has any connection to the tournament. From the yogurt and blueberries to the pro exhibition to the unnecessary stress of players playing in front of college coaches, the "Zoo" will always have a special place in American tennis. The history and traditions make the players feel like they are playing the US Open.

Thanks to modern technology, I was able to watch all five sets yesterday. It is appropriate that the boy's final is the best of five sets because the winner earns a main draw wild card to the upcoming US Open and the runner-up earns a spot in the qualifying rounds. I had a special interest in the match because the two finalists, Patrick Kypson and J.J. Wolf, have worked with three of my associates. J.J. has worked with Andy Fitzell and Patrick has worked with the Cloer brothers, Mat and Chris. Plus I have watched my son, Connor, practice with both boys. Patrick won (6-7 (1), 6-4, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2).

Obviously both boys are great competitors or they would not be on America's center stage of junior tennis. I have had Patrick play many younger players with his opposite hand and he doesn't take the challenge lightly. Patrick has also helped out with our "Form Tournament" and, as a result, has been a role model for our campers learning a solid foundation. Perhaps you would enjoy watching the two attached videos that served as a "tennis camp moment."

Steve Smith
GreatBase Tennis
www.GreatBaseTennis.com
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